Kangana Ranaut who shot to fame with Gangster and Woh Lamhe didn’t mind doing some seriously sensational scenes. In Woh Lamhe there is a scene in which she throws off her panty at Shiney Ahuja. That shows the actress is lion hearted when comes to doing bold scenes.

Now she is doing a film titled Fashion under the direction of Madhur Bhandarkar. In this film Kangana is playing the character inspired from the real life story of Model Gitanjali Nagpal.

If the buzz is to be believed Kangana appears top less in this film! Taking a cue from Carol Gracia’s infamous wardrobe malfunction Madhur has canned a similar scene on Kangana where she drops her top while walking on the ramp. Kangana didn’t use a body double for this scene!

Madhur is not willing to reveal too many details about this scene. If this scene successfully comes out of Censors, no doubt Kangana is going to create ripples all over!

Pantaloon Retail Limited announced that it has tied up with Yash Raj Films, for merchandising opportunities for their film, ‘Ta Ra Rum Pum’, starring Saif Ali Khan and Rani Mukherji in the lead, along with child artists Ali Haji and Angelina Idnani.

As per the alliance, Pantaloon Retail Ltd has created special Ta Ra Rum Pum themed merchandise across numerous categories including apparel, accessories, toys, stationery, luggage and plastics. These will be available in stores upto May 15, 2007, across various PRIL retail formats including Big Bazaar, Pantaloons Fresh Fashion, Depot, Central, Food Bazaar and Fashion Station.

The merchandise available at Pantaloons Fresh Fashion stores primarily includes specially designed Ta Ra Rum Pum themed apparel t-shirts, shirts, bottom wear, blouses, shorts, frocks and skirts for men, women and kids (boys and girls). At Big Bazaar, apart from apparel for boys & girls; toys (such as remote controlled racing cars, friction cars, track sets); school bags; lunch boxes; water bottles; sippers; mugs; etc. are also be available.

Stationery items such as compass boxes, geometry sets, notebooks key chains, colouring and activity books are available at Depot standalone stores and shop-in-shops at Big Bazaar.

Said Sanjeev Agrawal, CEO, Pantaloons Fresh Fashion, “We are excited to be associated with Yash Raj Films, through their much awaited film ‘Ta Ra Rum Pum’. Consumers will be able to experience the film throughthe merchandise, which spans apparel, accessories, toys, stationery, luggage and plastics, available at our prominent retail formats Big Bazaar & Pantaloons Fresh Fashion, all across the country. Ta Ra Rum Pum themed merchandise is reasonably priced and designed to appeal to men, women and kids, alike.”

Said Sanjeev Kohli, CEO, Yash Raj Films, “Ta Ra Rum Pum is a film, which celebrates the triumph of the human spirit, against all odds. Tara Rum Pam has all the makings of a blockbuster – great direction by Siddharth Anand, freshness of Vishal-Shekhar’s tunes and lyrics by songsmith extraordinaire, Javed Akhtar.” He added, “Yash Raj Films looks at innovative new ways to engage with film buffs and bring more of the cinema into their everyday lives. ‘Ta Ra Rum Pum’ merchandise will enable fans to connect with the characters of the film and live life like their on screen idols.”

Directed by the popular director, Siddharth Anand, ‘Ta Ra Rum Pum’ is a story of a race car driver Rajveer Singh (played by Saif Ali Khan), a music student Radhika (played by Rani Mukerji) his family (played by child artists Ali Haji and Angelina Idnani) and how they overcome the obstacles that life puts in their way, together.

It is the story of triumph of the human spirit, against all odds. Ta Ra Rum Pum releases in theatres across the country on April 27, 2007.

Bollywood stars Urmila Matondkar, Shilpa Shetty, Milind Soman and Dino Morea wowed the Pakistani audience as they modelled outfits by Indian designers at a Lux carnival in Karachi.

The works of top Indian designers, including Manish Malhotra and Tarun Tahiliani, were displayed at the annual Lux Carnival de Couture in Karachi Saturday evening.

Pakistan’s own fashion tycoon Rizwan Beyg displayed some of his best works, Daily Times reported.

Urmila Matondkar said that Pakistani and Indian actors have been trying arduously to bring the two countries closer, but she said bureaucracies of the two countries were ‘a major hindrance’ in their efforts.

She said this should not mean that attempts to create harmony and brotherhood between the two countries should stop.

Shilpa praised the local cuisine and said that both countries should always remain friends, the newspaper quoted her as saying.

Bollywood often acts as a launch-pad for young and hip fashion designers.

While Manish Malhotra dressed Urmila Matondkar in Rangeela, Anaita Shroff Adajania got designer assignment for the recent blockbuster Dhoom-2.

Today, the King Khan’s shades and ties in Don, designed by Aki Narula, are very much in vogue.

Manish Malhotra has come a long way since then to become Bollywood’s favorite fashion designer, bagging blockbusters like Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna and Kal Ho Na Ho and also the upcoming and much hyped Salaam-e-Ishq. The last one was in association with Vikram Phadnis who was won laurels for his latest collection presented at the recently concluded Lakme Fashion Week.

Creating that perfect look is so vital to liven up the character that even the directors, producers and the script writers spend months working ceaselessly with the designers.

As far as actresses are concerned, Rani Mukerji’s ethnic skirts in Bunty aur Babli and Bip’s styles in Corporate and unbelievably sensual outfits in Dhoom-2 have generated a craze among star gazers.

With a string of historic movies like Umrao-Jaan this year, and several on the way, designers have been presented with great opportunities that offer wide room for experimentation.

Another industry darling Neeta Lulla, currently working on epic Jodha Akbar explains, “I have spent months scouring the market for the right fabric and accessories for this period film.”

This is the kind of platform Bollywood has created for fashion designers who dedicate themselves to such projects, grateful for the opportunity, and work untiringly to creating magnum opuses on the celluloid!

A hair cut like Shahrukh, Salman or Hrithik, now dress up like them!

According to experts in the industry, Bollywood and Hollywood heavily influence the fashion terrain. Other than advertisement through various media level, the big fashion houses are taking the advantage of the filmi route for the publicity of their brands.

Movie lovers tend to pick up style ideas of the actors. The biggest fashion trend in the world always began with an actor or a movie. It makes sense for mainstream garment brands to tie up with films that reflect the personalities of their labels.

Now the fashion brands instead of relying only on the traditional forms of advertising, convey their ideas through atmosphere of the story. A movie is like a three-hour advertisement for the brand with the opportunity of showcasing an ample collection dressed in by different actors in the movie.

The line of clothing worn by the actors includes ties, shirts, designer saris, dresses that had a lot of colour, shimmer and were created for corporate, leisure, evening and workwear.

Sex, lies and fashion

October 26, 2006

Three years ago, I wrote a column on how much I loathed Madhur Bhandarkar’s Page Three and how shocked I was by its commercial success. Now, like an old ghost, out to haunt me, Mr Bhandarkar’s threatening to make his next film on another world he knows as little about—fashion.

It doesn’t end there, his inspiration, and no prizes for guessing this, comes from the hapless Carol Gracias’ wardrobe malfunction at the last Lakme India Fashion Week.

Like he did with his previous three films, Bhandarkar is out to take up for the downtrodden in this fraternity now. Madhur Bhandarkar as the new Mahatma Gandhi? Shudder.

Excuse me for being a snob, but we in fashion can do well without Bhandarkar’s patronising interference. In his trademark style, his new film will reek of old cliches. The designers will all be crack-heads and gay, stealing each others embroiderers and designs. The models will all be incestuous sleep-arounds, anorexic and cattily competitive. The journalists will only be interested in bloopers and controversies.

So you will see about the reticent Mumbai designer who has sex with his tailors after work hours. And you will hear about the beefcake model who fornicated with the married socialite from Delhi in a nightclub’s loo while a designer stood guard outside. And also about the couturier who hit on a cabbie, in the wee hours of a drunken morning, and was beaten up at Chowpatty. And about children being sodomised (a leitmotif in his films) in karkhanaas.

Bhandarkar might tell you about the designer who accused another of stealing his design when his work originally was ‘inspired’ by a spread in the previous season’s Collezioni. And how models undercut each other’s prices to get more work. He will also introduce you to scribes who cover fashion only so they can party for free. And all of it will be true.

But his limited sensibilities —and I’m using his previous films as reference — will omit the inventiveness of a creation, the toil behind fine tailoring, the tear in a bride-to-be’s eye when she spots her wedding lehenga and how some journalists will fight tooth and nail to promote an up and coming talent when editors are only interested film stars on the runway.

The audience will miss out on the gloss and glitz that Bhandarkar can never succeed in reproducing. He wouldn’t know his shoe from Jimmy Choo. For that we have the stylish Karan Johar, bless his soul.

I’ve never been one to believe that fashion must exist in a gilt-edged ivory tower with no relevance to the movie-going common man. Or that style must not be corrupted by the clinches of Bollywood. But Bhandarkar, who’s made cynicism a habit, is not the man for that. Especially since he wasted the lovely

Bipasha Basu in a silly film called Corporate Bhandarkar’s world is either black or white. Ironically, the ‘it’ colour for the season is grey.